Four Corners Power Play Breakout

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Barry on 11/15/2017

Nov 16th

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This power play breakout system can catch oppoenents off guard beacuase it is not very common. It is not one to do on a regular basis but could be very effective to give your opponents a different look. It is most effective against a team that is forecehcking with an "I" formation or diamond. The opposing coach may catch on quickly and simply use a box formation which is the perfet way to counter this power play breakout.  In the animations you will see there are many options and the players will have to take what the opponents give them. The basic concept is to work the outside of the ice by spreading it out as much as possible and then try to work it back to the inside. At the very least when executed well it should lead to an easy zone entry.

To set it up the defense will set up behind the net and the other four players will go to the fouf corners of the neutral zone as shown. Place each player on the off-hand so that they can make strong plays to the middle of the ice on their forehand. The defense will bring the puck out from behind the net and suck in the first forechecker. Then they will make a pass to one of the players along the wall on the near blue line. This next player has several options as shown in the animation.

Option #1

Look to the middle of the ice as the far forwad is swinging between the defense.

Option #2

Pass the puck behind the far player to the other player (slightly behind the stretch player). This has to be a strong pass and will give the far player a lot of time and space to enter the zone.

Option #3

The first player acts as a decoy and lets the puck go to the player at the far blue line. This can catch the opponents by surprise. The far player should have easy access into the zone.

In every case the players should be attacking the zone with net drive and a player high.